Agriculture Films Worth the Watch

With the creation of anti-agriculture documentaries and films on the rise, I often find myself wondering, “where are all the positive and pro-agriculture films?” So after some research, I took a dive into a few films and videos that showcase the story of agriculture… and I wasn’t disappointed! Whether you’re looking for a movie to watch after a day on the farm or you want to showcase a positive light on agriculture in your classroom or with friends, I strongly recommend the following films.

Farmland

leighton

Photo credit: Farmland Film website

Farmland takes a look at six young farmers and ranchers working in different sectors of agriculture. The film looks at why these individuals have chosen to farm and the everyday decisions they make to be successful and profitable. Farmland makes you feel connected to the farmers and their stories because it shows how relatable they each are. The passion these families have for agriculture is easy to see and will make you thankful for farmers and ranchers across the country. Grab some friends and go check out Farmland!

Where to watch: Amazon Prime, iTunes, YouTube, PlayStation, Xbox and Vudu.

License to Farm

Capture License to Farm

Photo credit: License to Farm website

This 30-minute film features Canadian farmers and researchers discussing the growth of genetics, technology and communication within the agriculture industry. The question “Where does my food come from?” and consumer push-back inspired the film. Three concerns held by consumers are touched on: GMOs, pesticide use and the thought that farmers have no control over their production practices. The science behind food production is shared to debunk these concerns. The film also urges farmers to share their stories to help educate consumers in their communities. Check out License to Farm if you want to learn more about positive trends in agricultural technology and food production!

License to Farm can be viewed at licensetofarm.com.

Food Evolution

Photo credit: Food Evolution website

If you like science, then Food Evolution is a great film to check out! The film tackles food myths and misconceptions, especially around GMOs. Food Evolution looks at science and research to back the safety of GMOs and seed production. Science terminology isn’t always the easiest to understand and Food Evolution does a great job at explaining biotechnology and science related to agriculture, in simple and relatable ways. The film looks at the positive impact genetic modification has on preventing disease and insect damage to crops. I would highly recommend watching Food Evolution to grow your understanding of science and agriculture.

Where to watch: Amazon Video, iTunes, YouTube, Hulu and Google Play.

Why I Farm

Photo credit: Why I Farm website

While the Why I Farm video series might not be actual “films,” they’re still well worth the watch! These short videos were developed by Beck’s Hybrids and highlight Midwest farmers and their families. The focus of the videos is as the title suggests: why these farmers have chosen to pursue and remain in the agriculture industry. Each video features the unique story and journey of a farmer, told in their words. If you don’t have time to watch an entire movie, I suggest checking out these short films – you won’t be disappointed!

This series can be viewed at  whyifarm.com.

Maryland Farm & Harvest

Capture MD Farm & Harvest

Photo credit: Maryland Public Television website

Maryland Farm & Harvest is another series that features the faces of farming around the state. The 30-minute videos focus on current technology used in agriculture, challenges that farmers face and what different areas of agriculture look like. This series aims to connect viewers to the people who raise their food in a positive and informative way. Maryland Farm & Harvest features everything from bees to cow pedometers to oyster farming. Even if you’re not from Maryland, these videos are great to watch if you desire to learn about all segments of agriculture!

Maryland Public Television presents this series on their channel, but the latest episodes can also be viewed here.

Before the Plate

Before the Plate debuted in February 2019. The movie aims to close the gap between urban consumers and farmers in Canada. The movie follows chef John Horne to different farms throughout Canada to see how food is produced, including a beef and dairy farm.

These films and videos were great to watch and helped me grow my understanding of food production and agriculture. So grab some popcorn and go check them out!

‘What The Health’ claims get debunked

Some determined activists will say almost anything to convince people to go vegan. One example of this is “What The Health,” a film you might have seen while scrolling through Netflix. If you’ve watched the movie, it may have left you feeling confused about the nutritional value of meat, milk, poultry and eggs.

Several scientists, dietitians and agriculture advocates have started speaking out against the film and helping viewers find factual information to make decisions about their diets. Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise analyzed each health claim made in the film and concluded that 96 percent were bogus and not based on sound science. Dr. Harriet Hall, a retired family physician says the film “cherry-picks scientific studies, exaggerates, makes claims that are untrue, relies on testimonials and interviews with questionable “experts,” and fails to put the evidence into perspective.”

Here are some of the main claims from the film debunked:

Red and processed meats cause cancerBurger

The World Health Organization (WHO) report that brought this controversy to the forefront relied on a few weak studies and ignored numerous other studies that have affirmed the nutritional benefits of consuming meat. Since the report was released, the WHO said “meat provides a number of essential nutrients and, when consumed in moderation, has a place in a healthy diet.”

A 2015 meta-analysis of 27 studies concluded that the link between cancer and red meat consumption is actually pretty weak. In another 2015 meta-analysis of 19 studies, scientists concluded “the results from our analyses do not support an association between red meat or processed consumption and prostate cancer.”

Sodium nitrite, a salt used to cure meats like sausage, bacon and ham is often brought to the table when discussing cancer and processed meat; but the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP), which is considered the “gold standard” in determining whether substances cause cancer, completed a multi-year study that found nitrite was not associated with cancer. NTP maintains a list of chemicals found to be carcinogenic. Sodium nitrite is not on that list.

Sugar and carbohydrates don’t cause diabetes, instead it is caused by eating meat

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Starchy foods can be a part of a healthy meal plan, but portion size is key. Being overweight does increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes. The ADA recommends that people should avoid intake a sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes.

A 2016 study and meta-analysis regarding sugar and diabetes concluded, “habitual consumption of sugar sweetened beverages was associated with a greater incidence of type 2 diabetes.”

Avocado egg toastEating one egg is the same as smoking five cigarettes

Yes, they actually made this outrageous claim. There’s no way an egg has the same health effects as smoking cigarettes. Eggs are packed with 6 grams of protein, 14 essential nutrients (including choline and vitamin D) and they’re only 70 calories each – how can you beat that combo?!

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend three healthy eating patterns…all of which include eggs. According to a 2015 peer reviewed study about the effects of egg and egg-derived foods on human health, “eggs represent a very important food source, especially for some populations such as the elderly, pregnant women, children, convalescents and people who are sports training.”

Pregnant women who eat meat, milk and eggs are introducing toxins to their child

Wrong again. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a pregnant woman should eat lean red meat, poultry, fish, dried beans and peas to obtain the daily recommended dose of iron during pregnancy.  A 2013 study states pregnant women “should eat foods that contain adequate amounts of choline” and milk, meat and eggs just happen to be choline-rich! Now you may say – pregnant women can skip meat, milk and eggs if they take a prenatal vitamin, right? Nope. The study also states that “prenatal vitamin supplements do not contain an adequate source of choline.”

Milk contains pusDrinking milk

Let’s put this misinformation, frequently used to try to scare you out of drinking milk, to rest. Here’s an awesome explanation from Carrie Mess, a Wisconsin dairy farmer…

Somatic cell count (SCC) is a measurement of how many white blood cells are present in the milk. “White blood cells are the infection fighters in our body and so an elevated white blood cell presence or on a dairy farm an elevated SCC is a signal that there may be an infection that the cow is fighting. Dairy farmers are paid more money for milk that has a low SCC, if our cell count raises above normal levels they will dock the amount we get paid for our milk, if it raises even higher they stop taking our milk and we can’t sell it. So not only do we not want our cows to be sick, it would cost us a lot of money and could cost us our farms if we were to ignore a high SCC. While the current US regulation is that milk must have a cell count under 750, dairy coops and companies generally require under 400 and most dairy farms aim for a SCC under 200. So, does this mean that we are allowing some pus into your milk? No. All milk is going to have some white blood cells in it, that’s the nature of a product that comes from an animal, cells happen.”

Animal Agriculture AllianceFor these and more claims from the film debunked, check out this resource from the Animal Agriculture Alliance. The Alliance also provides detailed reports to its members on popular books and movies pushed by animal rights activists along with films that are positive towards farmers and ranchers.

This film is tagged as a “documentary,” but I would argue it should be categorized as a comedy because it has so many absurd allegations about food and agriculture.

As always, if you have concerns about your health or the foods you eat, you should consult your doctor!

Lights, Camera…Misinformation!

It’s lights, camera, action for America’s farmers and ranchers – whether they auditioned or not. Films are popping up on the big (and small) screen, putting animal agriculture under increased scrutiny. These films often claim they are “shedding light” on the agriculture industry, but they usually leave out the true story.

Producer vs. Producer 

It could be a great thing to have American farmers and ranchers showcased for raising the safest food supply out there and providing great care to their animals, but when film producers attack the producers of our food, fuel and fiber it can spread misconceptions and “alternative facts” – especially when the films are produced by or in collaboration with animal rights groups.

Producing films (and publishing books) is not a new tactic animal rights groups are using to further their mission of putting farmers and ranchers who produce meat, milk, poultry and eggs out of business, but they are getting more attention in recent years. This is due to increased interest in how food gets from the farm to the fork along with the popularity of movie platforms like Netflix.

Lights, Camera…Misinformation!

Documentaries are supposed to provide a factual report of a certain event or issue, but the films produced by activists skew the truth or ignore it all together. Some claim they are giving an “unbiased” look into how food is raised on farms, but is it unbiased if the film is produced a vegan who only interviews other vegans?

Activist films are often how myths get started – because if it’s in a “documentary” it must be 100 percent true, right? Here are a few ways to tell if you’re watching an activist movie, or as Leah McGrath, dietitian and agvocate, likes to call them – “Shockumentaries.”

  • Cherry-picking studies
  • Playing ominous background music
  • Using outdated information and studies from 1841
  • Taking things out of context
  • An animal rights group is the main sponsor
  • The overwhelming majority of the cast is vegan
  • The call to action is “GO VEGAN!”

One of the main claims from an activist film recently released to Netflix is eating one egg is the same as smoking five cigarettes. I was honestly happy to hear this lie included because any rational person would recognize it as crazy and discredit the rest of the movie.

A pig farm

The Animal Agriculture Alliance has more than 20 movie and book reports summarizing these activist films which are available to our members. Each report lists out the main claims so you don’t have to go through the trouble of wasting an hour or two of your time, but can stay informed on what the other side is saying about our industry.

What’s worth watching…

As for what you should watch to learn more about agriculture and food production, how about videos of farmers taking you on a virtual tour of their farms?! They may not be as dramatic as the activist films, but they do show the truth. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Fresh Air Farmer – a dairy farmer from Canada taking you on a different farm tour every week (from a celery farm to a pig farm!)
  • Farmland – a movie showcasing young farmers and ranchers across the United States
  • Chicken Checkin videos – the National Chicken Council put together a series of videos showing how broiler chickens are raised
  • Farm tour from Tyson Foods chicken farm – a recent video by Tyson Foods, Inc. about their commitment to animal care and sustainability
  • The Udder Truth – series of videos from dairy farmers about what really happens on America’s dairy farms
  • Veal farm tour – a veal farmer from Wisconsin invites you on a virtual tour
  • Turkey farm tour – a turkey farmers from California takes viewers onto his farm

Turkey farm tour!

Farmers and ranchers realize how important it is to be transparent and many have added advocate to their list of farm chores. They’re the true experts on farm animal care and know if they don’t tell their story animal rights activists will not only tell their version of the story, but make it into a book or film. So, the next time you hear of a “documentary” about animal agriculture ask yourself this question: who is telling the story? The farmers and ranchers who raise and care for the animals or the activists who could care less about animal care and just want to take meat off everyone’s plate?